Updates

2915 BLOOR ST. W – Montgomery Condominium

Posted in Development, Updates, Ward 5

 

The Montgomery Condominium background –

City of Toronto BY-LAW No. 646-1999

  1. (b) (ii) the maximum building height shall be 20.0 m, measured from the finished grade elevation to the top of the roof slab, excluding the parapet, mechanical penthouse, stair enclosures, and roof-top conservatory, provided that such uses do not exceed a height of 5 m

 

This is also posted in 2915: everything you need to know. Links included.

2915 Bloor St. OMB – Additional Background Material

Posted in Development, Updates, Ward 5

 

Additional background material:

The decision on 4187 Dundas and the fight against the Applicant by the residents group KRAPP (no longer a working group) is sited by many at this time in relation to the present day fight against 2915 Bloor Street West.

Both documents/decisions may be read in full on our website: www.councillordiciano.ca

Sadly the Residents Group and the City Lost and the OMB approved the application.

It is interesting to note that after being approved at 7 by the OMB the Applicant was awarded another 8th storey at the same height at Committee of Adjustment.

In summary, the Board finds, having regard to the determinate policy documents, the PPS and the Etobicoke Official Plan, the proposal is an appropriate form of residential intensification at the subject site and constitutes good planning and is in the public interest.  The site is located on an arterial road, at an intersection with a collector road.  It is in an area which is changing and evolving to reflect a need for residential intensification in appropriate urban areas, a need to locate development in proximity to public transit and a desire to improve the urban environment along Dundas St. W., while, at the same time, preserving the character of stable neighbourhoods.  As the Board notes above, having regard to the Etobicoke OP and the Avenues Study, the height and density of the proposed building is to be considered in terms of impact on the low-rise residential neighbourhood to the south.  Some neighbours believe that the proposal represents too much height, density and change. The Board, having found that there would be no negative impact in terms of shadow, privacy, overlook, traffic or demand on public infrastructure, cannot find that the proposal will have a negative impact on the neighbourhood to the south.

The appeal with respect to the zoning by-law is allowed.  The zoning by-law will be amended substantially in accordance with attachment Exhibit # 10, Attachment 1.

The holding designation is to be lifted in accordance with the agreement of the City.

The Board will withhold its final order with respect to the site plan until it is provided with a final site plan and site plan conditions.  The Board expects to receive such site plan and conditions within six weeks of the date of issuance of this Decision.

This is the Order of the Board.

 

File Number: A437/1 1 EYK   Thursday, August 25, 2011

Notice was given and a Public Hearing was held on Thursday, August 25, 2011, as required by the Planning Act.

PURPOSE OF THE APPLICATION:

To construct an 8-storey residential condominium building with a total of 112 dwelling units.

It is the decision of the Committee of Adjustment to authorize this variance application for the following reasons. This decision is subject to the following condition(s):

  1. 8 storeys but no increase in height, i.e. the building maintains the 0MB approved height of 24.5

metres, not including rooftop mechanical rooms, rooftop amenity space (indoor and outdoor), screen walls,

railings and architectural features, and

  1. The proposed rooftop structures, including the mechanical penthouse, occupy a maximum area of 400 m2, and
  1. The cornice lines of the building project into the 45-degree angular plane above the 5’ floor or 15.11 metres on the south elevation of the building closest to the detached houses on Prince Edward Drive

Regretfully he history on this fight by KRAPP / Dean French and The City  does not provide a good precedence for success.

 

All 2915 related documents, updates and information are available in one organized post on our website.

Westbound Lane Closure – Lake Shore Blvd at Humber Loop (Weather Permitting)

Posted in Updates, Ward 5

 

 
Closure Start Date: 10:00A.M. Monday , December 4 , 2017
NEW Closure End Date:  Mid-day Saturday December 16, 2017
 
The current westbound traffic restrictions on Lake Shore Boulevard West between Palace Pier Court and Brookers Lane will remain in place until mid-day Saturday, December 16th. The need to extend the westbound lane closure resulted from an unexpected change in work on Lake Shore Blvd West at the Humber Loop entrance/exit. To comply with Enbridge safety regulations deep test pits were required, the contractor has had to locate a vital gas main and other underground utilities before proceeding with the track work. The westbound lane closure of Lake Shore Boulevard near Humber Loop will be extended for five additional days. Crews will work diligently to re-open the westbound lane by mid-day December 16th.
 

Councillor Justin Di Ciano Pursues Parking Issues For You!

Posted in Updates

 

 

MM35.39

(New)

Above Ground Parking Deck at Kipling Hub – by Councillor Justin J. Di Ciano, seconded by Councillor Mark Grimes  (Ward 5)   URGENT * This Motion has been deemed urgent by the Chair. * This Motion is not subject to a vote to waive referral. This Motion has been added to the agenda and is before Council for debate.

 

Above Ground Parking Deck at Kipling Hub – by Councillor Justin J. Di Ciano, seconded by Councillor Mark Grimes
 

 

* This Motion has been deemed urgent by the Chair. * This Motion is not subject to a vote to waive referral. This Motion has been added to the agenda and is before Council for debate.
 

 

Recommendations
Councillor Justin J. Di Ciano, seconded by Councillor Mark Grimes, recommends that:

1. City Council request the Toronto Transit Commission in collaboration with the Toronto Parking Authority, to undertake a study to assess the parking needs for the terminus of the Line 2 subway line at Kipling Station to ensure that suburban commuters have access to adequate parking which would allow and encourage the use of public transit.

2. City Council request the Toronto Realty Agency and the Toronto Parking Authority to assess parking requirements as part of the future Etobicoke Civic Centre to encourage the use of public transit from the new city centre.

 

 

Summary
There is enormous pressure now on commuter parking from Etobicoke and Mississauga in the Bloor and Kipling area due to parking lots closing at Islington/Cordova.  Commuters are using school and community centre parking lots instead. If we want drivers to use public transit we need to accommodate the parking needs.
 

 

Background Information
Member Motion MM35.39 (http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/mm/bgrd/backgroundfile-109794.pdf)

 

City of Toronto Regulates Short-term Rentals

Posted in Updates

 

 

The new regulations will allow a property owner or tenant to participate as an operator (host) of a short-term rental in their principal residence, where they may share up to three bedrooms, or rent their entire residence on short-term durations but for no more than a total of 180 days a year. Short term rentals are rentals that are offered in periods of 28 consecutive days or less, and are typically facilitated through short-term rental companies (platforms) such as Airbnb.

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City of Toronto Regulates Short-term Rentals [SUMMARY]

Posted in City Wide, Updates

 

Toronto City Council has adopted recommendations to create a new bylaw for short-term rental regulations in the City of Toronto.

 

The new regulations will allow a property owner or tenant to participate as an operator (host) of a short-term rental in their principal residence, where they may share up to three bedrooms, or rent their entire residence on short-term durations but for no more than a total of 180 days a year. Short term rentals are rentals that are offered in periods of 28 consecutive days or less, and are typically facilitated through short-term rental companies (platforms) such as Airbnb.

 

“These regulations do the right thing in the right way. They strike a balance that embraces new technology and allows short-term rentals while protecting communities,” said Mayor John Tory. “I’m proud City Council has found a way to regulate short-term rentals in a way that will keep housing affordable.”

The new regulations will take effect June 1, 2018. City staff will create an online registration system for short-term rental operators and will meet with short-term rental platform companies to provide guidance on the new regulations.

 

Homeowners and tenants who wish to share their principal residence and become a short-term rental operator will be required to register with the City through a new online registration system for an annual fee of $50.

 

Short-term rental platform companies, such as Airbnb, will require a license from the City. The initial application fee will be $5,000 and an annual licensing fee based on $1 per night booked through the platform.

 

The City is taking steps to accommodate people’s desire to participate in home-sharing arrangements as both guests and hosts, while balancing the need to maintain rental housing stock and avoid commercialization of residential neighbourhoods.

 

City Council considered two staff reports today on this issue; a report from the Licensing and Standards Committee, LS23.1 Licensing and Registration Regulations for Short-Term Rentals, available at: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2017.LS23.1

A report from the City’s Planning and Growth Management Committee, PG24.8 Zoning By-law and Zoning By-law Amendments to Permit Short-term Rentals, available at http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2017.PG24.8.

Each link includes the decision history and amendments passed by Council.